2011 June

Congratulations to Our Newest Graduates!

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With rolling enrollment, the Academy’s students start their courses as soon as they are accepted without having to wait for the next semester to begin. The Academy is proud to announce its latest monthly graduates:

Bachelor’s Degree

  • Jack E. Proctor (Dilley, TX) – B.S.S. Sports Management
  • Sarah Lee Simonetti (Oceanside, Calif.) – B.S.S. Sports Studies
  • Jeffrey Michael Vega (Cheyenne, Wyo.) – B.S.S. Sports Coaching

Master’s Degree

  • Frank Bernard Armeni (Geneva, Ohio) – M.S.S. Sports Studies
  • John George Bertken (San Francisco, Calif.) – M.S.S. Sports Management
  • Quintel L. Cooks (Memphis, Tenn.) – M.S.S. Sports Studies
  • William Bryan Daniels (San Diego, Calif.) – M.S.S. Sports Management
  • Daniel Mark Eng (San Jose, Calif.) – M.S.S. Sports Management
  • Jason Manuel Fonseca (Richmond Hill, N.Y.) – M.S.S. Sports Coaching
  • Christopher Neal Hadersbeck (Durham, N.C.) – M.S.S. Sports Management/Coaching Dual
  • Shamae Sharee Hemingway (Conway, S.C.) – M.S.S. Sports Management
  • Marc Louis Holum (Bethlehem, Pa.) – M.S.S. Sports Coaching
  • Todd David Hutchinson (Sorento, Ill.) – M.S.S. Sports Coaching
  • Garrett Paul Knight (Irmo, S.C.) – M.S.S. Sports Management
  • Robin Dale Meeter (Tualatin, Ore.) – M.S.S. Sports Management
  • Becky Shae Pineo (Ocean City, N.J.) – M.S.S. Sports Coaching
  • Braden Joseph Richey (Kirkland, Wash.) – M.S.S. Sports Management
  • Janna M. Webb (Fair Haven, Vt.) – M.S.S. Sports Studies
  • Jeremy Ross Yates (Kingsport, Tenn.) – M.S.S. Sports Coaching

Michael Cleary Honored by the United States Sports Academy

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Michael Cleary (center), who is stepping down as National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics after 46 years, was honored by the United States Sports Academy on Thursday, June 16 at the NACDA annual convention in Orlando. Pictured with Cleary are Bob Vecchione (right), the new NACDA executive director, and Academy Vice President T.J. Rosandich (left).

Michael Cleary, who built the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics into one of the premier collegiate organizations during the past 46 years, was honored for his service by the United States Sports Academy on Thursday, June 16 at the NACDA annual convention in Orlando.

Cleary, the outgoing NACDA executive director, received a token of appreciation from the Academy during a ceremony that also included the presentation of the 2010 Carl Maddox Sports Management Award to Ohio State University Associate Vice President and Director of Athletics Gene Smith in front of a room full of current and former athletic directors.

“I’ve had great presidents who have given our association the leadership we have needed to reach the height that we have attained,” Cleary said.

Academy President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich credited Cleary for being “the genesis” for the founding of the Academy in 1968. The Academy’s first Board of Visitors consisted of 33 members and all but one were Directors of Athletics. Two of those original members went on to become chairman of the Academy’s Board of Trustees.

“I recently reflected upon the Academy’s long working relationship with NACDA, and Mr. Cleary has built it into one of the most regal sport organizations in this country, if not the most important,” Rosandich said. “I thank him for the 46 years of leadership that he has given the association. I know what it takes to build an organization and nobody could have done it better than Mr. Cleary.”

The Academy honored Cleary, who will continue to serve as NACDA director emeritus for the next three years, with an Honorary Doctorate in 2003. Bob Vecchione is taking over for Cleary as head of the organization.

Cleary, who was named the organization’s executive director in 1965, has led the association longer than any other current Division I conference commissioner, coaching association executive director or national association leader. In addition, Cleary has had the opportunity to work with all five NCAA presidents.

During the past 46 years, Cleary has overseen the creation of NACDA’s Convention, its 11 affiliate associations, Facilities Workshop, Security Summit, the NACDA Daily Review, the Learfield Sports Directors’ Cup and Athletics Administration. As president of the John McLendon Minority Scholarship Foundation, Cleary has been responsible for raising more than $2 million to date.

NACDA is the professional and educational association for more than 6,500 college athletics administrators at more than 1,600 institutions throughout the United States, Canada and Mexico.

Ohio State Athletic Director Gene Smith Accepts Academy’s Carl Maddox Sports Management Award

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Ohio State University Associate Vice President and Director of Athletics Gene Smith (center) accepted the United States Sports Academy’s 2010 Carl Maddox Sports Management Award Thursday, June 16 at the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics annual convention in Orlando. Dr. Gary Cunningham (left), an Academy Board of Trustees member and 2005 winner of the Maddox award, made the presentation with Academy Vice President Dr. T.J. Rosandich (right).

Ohio State University Associate Vice President and Director of Athletics Gene Smith accepted the United States Sports Academy’s 2010 Carl Maddox Sports Management Award for successfully guiding one of the nation’s most comprehensive and successful college athletic programs since 2005.

Smith received the award Thursday, June 16 during a ceremony at the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) annual convention in Orlando, Fla., in front of a who’s who of athletic directors and several past Sports Management award winners. Dr. Gary Cunningham, an Academy Board of Trustees member and 2005 winner of the Maddox award, made the presentation to Smith.

The Carl Maddox Sport Management Award, named in honor of the former Athletic Director of Louisiana State University and Mississippi State University, is given annually to an individual for his contributions to the growth and development of sport enterprise through effective management practices. The individual should exhibit mastery of all the management functions, be well known in the sport arena, and have an abiding belief in the need for ethical behavior in sport management.

At Ohio State, Smith oversees 36 fully-funded varsity sports and more than 1,000 student-athletes. The department of athletics is completely self-supporting and receives no university funds, tax dollars or student fees. In fiscal year 2009-10, the department transferred nearly $30 million in assessments to the university, including more than $13 million in grant-in-aid reimbursement. In Smith’s first three years at Ohio State, the department of athletics finished in the black financially and increased its reserve fund.

Now in his sixth year as Ohio State AD, the program is proving successful on the field, too, recently earning a second-place finish in the 2010-11 Learfield Directors’ Cup standings. The finish will mark the highest in the history of Ohio State. The Directors’ Cup standings is based on each institution’s finish in up to 20 sports – 10 women’s and 10 men’s – and will be finalized June 30.

As a former college athlete and coach, Smith is passionate about the well-being of student-athletes. “We want to create an environment for our student-athletes to be successful academically, athletically and socially,” he said. “The student-athlete experience provides teachable moments that prepare young women and men for success in life.”

Smith is the eighth person and first African-American to hold the athletics director position at Ohio State. During the past 25 years, he has also served as athletic director at Arizona State, Iowa State and Eastern Michigan universities.

Upon arriving at Ohio State, Smith quickly established himself as a respected and thoughtful leader, both within the university and the community. In the spring of 2007, he unveiled a five-year strategic plan, reflecting the department’s goals and values. The strategic planning process, inclusive of the entire department, emphasized the development of the total student-athlete.

Smith is also a past NACDA president and was the organization’s first African-American leader. In 2007, he was named to NACDA’s inaugural “Legends Class.” A Cleveland native, Smith played defensive end for the University of Notre Dame and was a member of the 1973 national championship team.

Academy Joins Haynes in Promoting King-Devick Test to Identify Concussions

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The United States Sports Academy is joining NFL Hall of Fame cornerback Michael Haynes in urging officials, coaches and parents involved in professional, college and youth sports to use the King-Devick Test to identify concussions and prevent more serious brain injuries.

The test is an easy and rapid sideline screening test for concussions that can be administered by parents, coaches, athletic trainers, medical professionals and others.

The King-Devick Test has been proven by research to be an objective, accurate and reliable method at a time when mounting data shows a link between concussions and brain damage and a form of dementia called chronic traumatic encephalopathy. CTE can cause symptoms such as chronic headaches, fatigue, sleep difficulties, sensitivity to light and noise, dizziness and short-term memory loss.

Haynes recently approached Academy President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich about getting behind the test. It’s estimated that every season, one in five U.S. athletes in a contact sport suffers a concussion and more than 3.5 million sports-and-related concussions occur each year in the United States.

Haynes said he believes the test, which takes about 60 seconds, should become a standard procedure employed across all sports at all levels when any athlete suffers head trauma. A former cornerback with the New England Patriots and Oakland Raiders, today Haynes is the National Football League’s Alumni’s Health & Wellness Committee chairman.

“I’m sure several of the protocols being implemented today would have protected guys from sustaining multiple head injuries during their careers in my day,” Haynes said. “The NFL is doing their due diligence and reviewing the King-Devick Test but I think that it’s likely that they will eventually use it in combination with other tests because studies will continue to be published regarding its accuracy and reliability.”

Here’s how the test works: You display three flash cards with a series of numbers on them to an uninjured athlete and record the time it takes them to read them out loud. You then display the test to the athlete again if they suffer head trauma. If an athlete is more than five seconds slower in reading the numbers compared to their baseline test taken when they were healthy, then they can be confidently diagnosed as suffering a concussion.

For more than 25 years, the King-Devick Test has been used as a tool in eye care and in psychologists’ office in relation to saccadic eye movements and their relationship to reading. It has also been part of many states’ vision screening battery.

Dr. Enrico Esposito, the Academy’s Chair of Sports Medicine, urged leaders of sports programs everywhere to start using the test.

“This is an old visual test that has now shown great potential as a quick sideline assessment of concussions,” Dr. Esposito said. “It’s easy to administer and easy to teach and anyone can do it, not just a medical professional. We need coaches and others to start using this rapid survey so they can say, ‘OK, this kid is done.’”

Up until now, tests for concussions have often been inconclusive but the King-Devick Test proved effective in a study done by the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and published in the journal Neurology on April 26. The study examined 39 boxers and Mixed Martial Arts fighters and found post-fight test times on average for those who suffered head trauma worsened by 11.1 seconds, while those who had lost consciousness were on average 18 seconds slower. Those who did not suffer any head trauma actually improved their times by more than a second on average.

The King-Devick Test has given Academy leaders, Haynes and others high hopes that it will help solve the complex problem of concussions in athletes and prevent further more serious injuries.

Statistics from the Center for Disease Control show that the chance of a 30-49 year old man receiving a diagnosis of dementia, Alzheimer’s or another memory related disease is 1 in 1,000, while for an NFL retiree who is the same age the ratio is 1 in 53.

“The King-Devick Test provides doctors, athletic trainers, coaches, and even parents, with an easy tool to determine if the athlete should be removed from play to prevent a second head injury, which we now know can have more serious complications if the brain has not yet healed from the first concussion,” Haynes said.

Academy Slashes Tuition by One-Third for U.S. Military

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U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Tracy S. Lahr recommends Academy’s online courses to military members who serve overseas.

U.S. troops protect our country from threats around the world, yet they face many other concerns of their own in and outside of combat.

One thing they will not have to worry about anymore at the United States Sports Academy is whether they can afford a college education. The Academy’s Board of Trustees voted Friday to slash tuition by nearly one-third for active-duty military men and women and those in the “Wounded Warrior” program. The tuition cut will take effect July 4, 2011.

“Our brave men and women face enough threats already abroad and at home and they should not have any qualms about how to pay for their education,” said Academy President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich.

The Academy has a long record of being military friendly, helping many service men and women earn degrees and certifications, even while serving in Iraq or Afghanistan. Military members often comment that their time is filled with either terror or boredom. Hundreds have filled their time away from the frontlines by getting their education at the Academy because of its innovative technology that makes its courses available online to anyone, anywhere.

U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Tracy S. Lahr completed his Sports Performance courses in January, while serving in Kuwait. His battalion commander asked him to explain the Academy’s programs to all the other soldiers who were serving there during United States military operations in Iraq.

“The United States Sports Academy online courses are beneficial to anyone in the military who has the desire to continue to learn and to improve themselves both mentally and physically,” said Lahr, who is now back on American soil. “The Academy program provided me with a wealth of information relating to the fitness and nutrition industry. It will be a vital asset to me in both civilian and military life.”

However, getting a higher education is difficult for many who are serving amid the current economic crisis. Military members are struggling to provide food and shelter for their families. Record numbers of military families are relying on food stamps, with their use jumping 135% from 2008 to 2010. There is a military housing shortage, plus a mortgage assistance program for service members faces a $400 million budget deficit by the end of this year. Even before the recession hit, the latest Department of Defense report in 1999 found that 40% of lower ranking soldiers faced financial hardships.

On top of all those problems, the cost of a college education reached its highest levels ever. Tuition and fees are far outpacing the middle class median income. The cost of higher education surged 130% in the last 20 years, while earnings actually declined by $400 a year. In Alabama, tuition at the University of Alabama system’s three campuses is jumping 7.9% to 8.9% for in-state students and 6.8% to 8% for out-of-state students next year, while two-year state colleges are increasing tuition 16%.

The Academy, known worldwide as America’s Sports University, is reducing its Bachelor of Sports Science tuition for the military from $1,060 per course to $750 per course.

U.S. Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Vince Gonzales said the tuition reduction makes a big difference in his budget and that of other young Marines. He had estimated before the tuition cut took effect that he would have to spend about $3,000 out of pocket to complete his bachelor’s degree in Sports Coaching at the Academy.

“It will drastically cut down on my costs and help a lot of younger guys who don’t have a lot of money and just could not endure that type of tuition before,” said Gonzales, who is stationed at Joint Base McGuire/Dix/Lake Hurst in New Jersey. “This will be very beneficial to the military and to the college because more of us will be willing to consider the Academy, instead of going to other schools that may cost less but are less prestigious.”

Active-duty military will be able to earn the Academy’s one-of-a-kind undergraduate degree. Courses are 100% online and accessible 24/7, making it flexible and convenient. In addition, the Academy’s innovative technology permits rolling enrollment, which allows students to start a course anytime from anywhere.

To enroll in the Academy’s upper-division bachelor program, students can transfer in a minimum of 36 and a maximum of 90 semester hours of college credits or already have an Associate’s Degree. There are three majors: Sports Coaching, Sports Management and Sports Studies, with a new emphasis in Sports Security. To learn more details about the program, visit www.ussa.edu/go/bachelors/.

The Academy is also extending the tuition reduction to those in the U.S. military “Wounded Warrior” program. Currently, the Academy is working with the program to deliver its online sports-specific education to military personnel, who are ill, wounded or disabled from post 9/11 overseas combat duty. The Academy hosted members of the Joint Chiefs of Staff’s Warrior and Family Services Program in August 2010 to begin providing its courses.

In 2007, Dr. Rosandich met with the Secretary of the Army to visit the Walter Reed Medical Center in Washington, D.C., and to meet with young, wounded American troops, many who were missing arms and legs from fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan. In August 2007, the Academy Scholarship for Wounded Warriors was created and Dr. Rosandich kicked off the scholarship fundraising drive with a personal $150,000 donation.

“Our soldiers sacrifice so much for our country,” Dr. Rosandich said. “This is a traumatic time for them and we try at the Academy to support them in any way that we can. Hopefully, the tuition cuts will allow some of our active-duty men and women to earn a degree and become a coach or sport administrator in the future. They should know that the Academy has the largest network of alumni in the sport profession and about 74% of our graduates end up employed in the $400 billion sport industry.”

People, Places, and Programs

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The Fédération Internationale Cinéma Télévision Sportifs (FICTS) appointed United States Sports Academy President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich to its Culture, Education and Youth Commission. FICTS is dedicated to promoting sport culture and Olympic values to the world’s youth through sport cinema, television, culture and communication in 108 countries and five continents. FICTS President, Professor Franco Ascani serves on the IOC’s Commission for Culture and Olympic Education with Dr. Rosandich.

Academy Vice President Dr. T.J. Rosandich traveled to Olympia, Greece, to lecture on the impact of the Internet and describe some of the pros and cons of Web 2.0 technology on May 12 at the International Olympic Academy’s 11th Joint International Session. The conference topics focused on some 3,000 years of human existence and development. Because his presentation was well received, Rosandich was selected by his fellow lecturers to deliver the closing remarks.

National Faculty member Dr. Simon Pack traveled to the Kingdom of Bahrain May 9-13 to teach Structure and Function of Sports, the first course in the Academy’s Sports Diploma program. The program is being delivered in conjunction with the Bahrain Olympic Committee (BOC). The Academy has played a vital role in the development of sports in Bahrain during its nearly 40-year relationship.

Academy National Faculty member Dr. Marty Avant is currently in Thailand teaching a course in sports security management. Another national faculty member, Dr. Michael Culpepper, will teach sports biomechanics in Thailand from June 27 to July 1. The courses are delivered in conjunction with the Sports Authority of Thailand (SAT) and are a part of the Academy’s international certification programs in sports management and coaching.

Dr. Samia Al Qattam, who is University of Bahrain department of physical education chairwoman, is now heading up the Academy’s new Sports Diploma program, which opened Saturday, May 21 with 29 students at the National Stadium in Riffa, Bahrain.

Nancy Raia, the Academy’s Art Committee chairwoman and the Eastern Shore Art Center’s community arts director, conducted an art therapy program, “heART for HOLT,” for Holt Elementary School’s more than 400 children in tornado-ravaged Tuscaloosa, Ala.

Mike Moran, an Academy’s Distinguished Service Award winner and Colorado Springs Sports Corporation senior media consultant, was inducted by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA) into its Hall of Fame as the recipient of the “2011 CoSIDA Lifetime Achievement Award.”

Texas Athletic Director DeLoss Dodds, an Academy Honorary Doctorate and Carl Maddox Sports Management Award recipient, was named Athletic Director of the Year at the Sports Business Awards sponsored by Street & Smith’s SportsBusiness Journal and SportsBusiness Daily on May 18 in New York City.

Dr. Louis G. Pack, a former Academy director, recently authored “The Arthritis Revolution.” Pack, who has more than 40 years of clinical and surgical experience, examines how you can prevent osteoarthritis, stop its progression, decrease painful symptoms and improve your level of activity or sports performance.

Donna Parks, the Academy’s coordinator of continuing education and military projects, attended an Education Fair at Fort Hood, Texas on May 17-18. This fair was held for Fort Hood’s soldiers, family members, Department of Army civilians and contract employees, as well as the many retired service members and their family members residing in the Killeen, Texas, area.

2003 Academy Sport Artist of the Year Bradstock Sets Age Group Record in Javelin

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Raold Bradstock in his colorful, hand-painted uniform at the 2008 U.S. Olympic Trials.

Only three things, according to Roald Bradstock, will keep him from his goal of advancing beyond qualifying rounds for the 2012 London Olympic Games: “I’m short, slow and old.”

Never one to shirk a challenge, though, the United States Sports Academy 2003 Sport Artist of the Year took a major step recently to overcoming those obstacles and realizing his dreams of competing in the javelin throw at the 2012 Olympic Games in London—at the age of 50.

Bradstock qualified May 19 for the Great Britain Olympic Trials, which will be his eighth Olympic trials in the javelin in his career. Bradstock qualified by setting the world age record for 49-year-olds with a javelin throw of 74.3 meters, or 245 feet and 1.5 inches at the Tucson, Arizona, Elite Throwers Classic.

Bradstock, who maintains a stringent athletic training schedule, moved up to the No. 3 ranking currently in Great Britain with the throw, which was also his longest in 11 years. Interestingly, his throw came on the 25th anniversary of his first World Javelin Record that he set at the same meet when he threw 81.74 meters or 268 feet, 2 inches.

“I was hoping for 100-degrees plus and a huge wind to help me throw further,” Bradstock said jokingly. “Unfortunately, I got neither. It was 70 degrees with a very slight breeze. I knew my really, really big throw was coming.”

Combining hard work with a healthy sense of humor, Bradstock represented Great Britain in the Olympics in 1984 and 1988. In 1992, he was an alternate for the team and in 1996 he was an alternate for the U.S. Olympic team after Bradstock became an American citizen in 1995. He competed in the 2000, 2004 and 2008 U.S. Olympic trials and reverted to his British citizenship to make his highly public bid for the 2012 Olympics.

In 2008, Bradstock was the oldest competitor at the U.S. Olympic trials and received international media attention not for his age but for the three brightly colored, hand-painted uniforms and matching javelins he used. He has earned acclaim, too, for his many Guiness Book of World Record attempts for throwing everything from fish to golf balls.

Plus, he’s widely known for his public support of the Olympic Games through his art. He earned the nickname, “The Olympic Picasso,” for his visionary ideas on how to combine sport and art with the Olympics and Paralympics in 2012. The painter, whose work has been exhibited worldwide, was named the Academy’s 2003 Artist of Year in recognition of his unique, award winning-style of art called “athletic abstraction.”

“It is amazing how my painted outfits and throwing antics have become so well known,” Bradstock said. “The Internet and media opportunities I have gotten over the past few years to promote my art have turned out to be a powerful mix.”

Dallas Mavericks’ Nowitzki and Oregon Sprinter Gardner Named May Athletes of the Month

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Dirk Nowitzki

Dallas Maverick Forward Dirk Nowitzki, who led his team in the NBA playoffs, and Oregon sprinter English Gardner, who set a U.S. junior record in the 100 meters, have earned the United States Sports Academy’s Male and Female May Athlete of the Month Awards.

Nowitzki, who team ended up winning the NBA Championship, led his team in May to the finals with his hot shooting to win the Academy’s Male Athlete of the Month award. The 7-foot German averaged 28.4 points per game in the playoffs up until the finals against the Miami Heat and had two 40-point games. He set a playoff record by hitting 24 free throws without a miss in a game and it was also the most FT’s made in a playoff game. He is one of four players in NBA history with career postseason averages better than 25 points and 10 rebounds.

Meanwhile, Gardner, a University of Oregon freshman, captured the women’s 100 meter title and set a U.S. Junior record at the Pacific-10 Conference Championships. Gardner’s record winning time was 11.03 seconds. The New Jersey native’s mark was fast enough to equal the third fastest junior women’s performance ever in the world, and Gardner now owns the Pac-10 meet record, previously held by Olympic champion Gail Devers.

The public is invited to participate in the worldwide Athlete of the Month nomination and ballot voting processes. Visit the Academy website to submit your nomination each month, and return to the website between the first and second Tuesday of each month to vote on the Athlete of the Month. The votes along with the Academy’s selection committee choose the winners and they are announced on the Academy’s website and in the online edition of the The Sport Update.

Finishing second in the male athlete category was Novak Djokovic. The No. 2-ranked men’s tennis player had 42 consecutive wins to begin 2011, tying John McEnroe’s best start to a year. He extended his perfect streak in May by winning the Madrid Open, Italian Open and advancing to the semifinals of the French Open.

English Gardner

Chelsea Thomas was runner up to Gardner in the Female May Athlete of the Month voting. Thomas, a Missouri sophomore softball pitcher, was a finalist for the National Collegiate Player of the Year Award and led her team to its third straight Women’s College World Series. During the playoffs, the Big 12 Pitcher of the Year improved her record to 31-6, throwing her fourth no-hitter of the season and eighth of her career.

Third place winners were Derrick Rose, a Chicago Bulls guard and Louisiana State University golfer Austin Ernst. The 22-year-old Rose became the NBA’s youngest MVP, averaging 25 ponts and 7.7 assists. Ernst became the first freshman to win the NCAA women’s golf title since Southern California’s Jennifer Rosales did so in 1998, winning at the Traditions Club in Bryan, Texas.

The winners will be considered as a candidate for the 2011 Athlete of the Year ballot. In December 2011, the Academy will name the Male and Female Athlete of the Year for the 27th consecutive year.  The recipients of these prestigious awards are selected annually through worldwide balloting hosted by the Academy in conjunction with USA Today and NBC Sports.

In 2010, the Male Athlete of the Year was Spain’s star football (soccer) player David Villa and the Female Athlete of the Year was South Korea’s No. 1 figure skater Yuna Kim. Both of these individuals dominated 2010’s ballot, receiving more than 12 votes per second from across the world.

Academy’s International Programs Grow

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The Academy’s Sports Diploma program in Bahrain done in collaboration with the Bahrain Olympic Committee and its Chief Executive Shaikh Khalid bin Abdulla Al Khalifa opened Saturday, May 21, with 29 students at the National Stadium in Riffa in Bahrain.

A three-week trip through Greece, the Middle East and Malaysia by Academy Vice President Dr. T.J. Rosandich yielded new and exciting educational opportunities and strengthened current programs.

During his nearly 42,800-mile round trip in May, Rosandich made several stops. First, he landed in Olympia, Greece, to make a presentation on the information evolution wrought by the advent of the Internet at an International Olympic Academy conference.

His next stop was in Bahrain, to kick off the certificate in sports management program with Bahrain Olympic Committee Chief Executive Shaikh Khalid bin Abdulla Al Khalifa. That was followed up with a meeting with officials in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates to discuss various sports education initiatives.

Finally, Rosandich ended up in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, where he met with Dr. Dato Ramlan bin Abdulaziz, the Director General of the National Sports Institute of Malaysia, to put together a program for that country’s athletic trainers, called sports paramedics.

“We’ve had long and successful relationships in these areas and developed many sport programs,” Rosandich said. “The accumulation of all our hard work is that I’m looking forward to the future and new and exciting programs.”

Olympia, Greece

Rosandich traveled to the birthplace of the Olympics to lecture on the impact of the Internet and describe some of the pros and cons of Web 2.0 technology on May 12 at the IOA’s 11th Joint International Session. The conference topics focused on some 3,000 years of human existence and development and drew about 130 participants from more than 70 countries.

Because his presentation was so well received, Rosandich was selected by his fellow lecturers to deliver the closing remarks summing up the presentations.

“It was an honor to be so selected so I’m pretty happy about that,” Rosandich said.

The Sport Journal will publish the papers in a special Olympic edition in the near future. Rosandich’s presentation, “Information Technology and Sports: Looking Toward Web 3.0,” is already online in The Sport Journal, the world’s largest, peer-reviewed online journal of sport.

Bahrain and United Arab Emirates

The Academy’s Sports Diploma program in Bahrain done in collaboration with the Bahrain Olympic Committee opened Saturday, May 21, with 29 students at the National Stadium in Riffa. Dr. Simon Pack, an Academy national faculty member, is teaching the sports management course in Bahrain, which will include real-world experience for the students helping on a project or event with various sports associations and organizations.

Rosandich was interviewed live on air by Radio Bahrain and by TV to talk about the Academy and its sports activities for Bahrain since 1977.

In addition, Rosandich met with United Arab Emirates officials in Abu Dhabi to discuss continued work there. The Academy established the country’s master plan to develop sports there in the early 1980s and has provided educational programs in coaching and sports management.

“We’ve done everything there from special sessions teaching military soldiers how to swim to helping physical education teachers to assess the efficacy of their programs in the schools,” Rosandich said.

Malaysia

In the final leg of his three-week trip, Rosandich explained the sports medicine diploma program to Dr. Ramlan. Currently, the Academy is training about 18,000 of Malaysia’s physical education teachers in sport. In 2012, the Academy plans to begin the Sports Paramedic Diploma program to help train more athletic trainers there, after Malaysian officials recently approved the concept of the program.

New Kung Fu Course Online Tells Secrets of Shaolin

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For the past year, the United States Sports Academy has been working with his Holiness Abbot Shi Yongxin and the Shaolin Temple to develop a course that introduces Shaolin philosophy and history to people online across the globe.

Now anyone interested in learning more about the unique and respected practices and philosophy of this ancient Chinese system can begin taking “The Philosophy of Shaolin Kung Fu” (CEB 205) continuing education course, which was made available Monday, June 13.

The core text for the new course derives from the newly translated English version, “Shaolin Kung Fu Secrets,” which is from a 1,500-year-old manuscript that Abbot Shi Yongxin gave to the Academy during his visit in November 2006 to receive his honorary doctorate. By using the five books of ancient Chan teachings provided so graciously by his Holiness, who is the spiritual leader of 400 million Chan Buddhists, the Academy has developed an online format to present these important teachings on key tenets of Shaolin philosophy.

Academy President and CEO Thomas P. Rosandich said that the university is indebted to the Abbot for making this cultural treasure available and for his blessings on this project. In addition, the translation of the manuscript from ancient Chinese and the development of the course was made possible by American Grandmaster Steve DeMasco of Concord, N.H.

“By unlocking this ancient Shaolin knowledge for people around the globe, we are exposing them to a time-tested and world respected philosophy,” Rosandich said. “It is my sincere hope that the collaboration between the Academy and Abbot Shi Yongxin will advance the Shaolin Temple goal of promoting dialog and cultural exchange among people around the world, helping them to overcome their differences, find harmony and live healthy, balanced lives.”

The course costs $200 and students who complete it will receive a Certificate of Completion signed by His Holiness. In this course, you will cover:

  • Spiritual Foundations – the many facets of the religious history and development of the Shaolin Temple;
  • Shaolin Ethics – the importance of developing a strong and moral character for Shaolin training;
  • Qigong – the practice of learning to focus and control internal energy called qi (or chi);
  • Meditation – learning to calm and order the mind;
  • Chinese Medicine – acupuncture, acupressure, and nutrition for a healthy body;
  • Physical Training – the martial art practice and strengthening exercises; and
  • Shaolin Today and How it Applies to You – where the Shaolin Temple and Philosophy fit into today’s global society and how understanding this philosophy and history can benefit you.

After completing this course, you should have a greater understanding of the history, development, and elements that comprise the Shaolin philosophy. Also, you should be able to apply principles from the teachings to your personal and professional life.

For enrollment information, contact the registrar at (251) 626-3303.

Q&A with NFL Hall of Fame Cornerback Michael Haynes

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In this Q&A with The Sport Update, NFL Hall of Fame Cornerback Michael Haynes discusses the issue of concussions and other safety problems in professional football. Haynes is currently the Chairman of the NFL Alumni’s Health and Wellness Committee.

UPDATE: Why should the NFL use the King-Devick Test to catch concussions?

HAYNES: The King-Devick Test has shown to be a quick and accurate objective method to determine if an athlete should be removed from play due to head trauma.

UPDATE: What do you think the likelihood of the NFL teams implementing the test?

HAYNES: The NFL is doing their due diligence and reviewing it but I think that it’s likely that they will eventually use it in combination with other tests because studies will continue to be published regarding its accuracy and reliability.

UPDATE: If they do what will it mean to all the other sports at professional and amateur levels?

HAYNES: The King-Devick Test provides doctors, athletic trainers, coaches, and even parents, with an easy tool to determine if the athlete should be removed from play to prevent a second head injury, which we now know can have more serious complications if the brain has not yet healed from the first concussion.

UPDATE: If the test had been used widely in the NFL during your career with the New England Patriots and Oakland Raiders, or even in the past few seasons when we became more aware of the danger of concussions, what do you think the effect would have been?

HAYNES: I’m sure several of the protocols being implemented today would have protected guys from sustaining multiple head injuries during their careers.

UPDATE: You have other initiatives you are supporting to make the game safer. What are they?

I’m advocating for pro football fields to be wider. The current field size doesn’t consider the increased size and speed of today’s players. Youth football games are played on the same size field as the pros. Others sports, such as baseball, basketball, soccer, volleyball, etc., give consideration to the difference in size, strength, and advanced technology of pro athletes.  Baseball fields, basketball courts, soccer fields, and other sports for the professional are played on different size fields.

Also, I support bigger rosters. When youth and professional athletes receive a brain injury, they will need to heal or they risk sustaining a more serious injury before returning to practice or play. A small roster size may encourage coaches and trainers to take chances.

UPDATE: There are other things, too, right?

Yes, I support mandates for:

  • properly fitted helmets and other equipment;
  • custom fit mouth-guards that provide mandibular joint protection; 
  • objective sideline protocols to determine if a concussion occurred;
  • every player, coach, and parent should be educated to recognize symptoms of a concussions and know what to do if one occurs;
  • the elimination of devastating hits to the head when a player is in a defenseless position.

NFL Hall of Famer Michael Haynes Pushes Simple King-Devick Test to Catch Concussions

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Michael Haynes

If you could conduct a simple, 60-second test to immediately determine whether your athlete suffered a concussion, would you do it?

Hall of Fame cornerback Michael Haynes would without a doubt. That’s why Haynes, the National Football League’s Alumni’s Health & Wellness Committee chairman, advocates the so-called King-Devick Test to everyone he can.

“I’m sure several of the protocols being implemented today would have protected guys from sustaining multiple head injuries during their careers in my day,” Haynes said in an interview. “The NFL is doing their due diligence and reviewing the King-Devick Test but I think that it’s likely that they will eventually use it in combination with other tests because studies will continue to be published regarding its accuracy and reliability.”

Concussions are Haynes No. 1 issue these days. He has delivered and received his share of brain-rattling hits during his 14-year NFL career with the Patriots and Los Angeles Raiders. He is now one of about 20 current and former players who will donate their brains to the Boston University School of Medicine for its research on head trauma and brain damage in athletes.

But concussions and resulting injuries may be reduced thanks to the King-Devick Test. Many like Haynes believe the test should become a standard procedure employed across all sports at all levels. The test is a rapid sideline screening test for concussions that can be administered by parents, coaches, trainers, medical professionals and others.

It has proven to be an accurate and reliable method at a time when mounting research shows a link between concussions and brain damage and a form of dementia called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which can cause symptoms such as chronic headaches, fatigue, sleep difficulties, sensitivity to light and noise, dizziness and short-term memory loss.

Here’s how the test works: You display a series of numbers on three flash cards to the athlete and record the time it takes them to read them out loud. By comparing results post injury to the athlete’s baseline test taken when healthy, concussions can be confidently diagnosed if their response is more than five seconds slower. The test also checks for impairments of eye movement, attention, language and other symptoms of impaired brain function.

For more than 25 years, the King-Devick Test has been used as a tool in eye care and psychologists’ office in relation to saccadic eye movements and their relationship to reading. It has also been part of many states’ vision screening battery.

Up until now, tests for concussions have often been inconclusive but the King-Devick Test proved effective in a study done by the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and published in the journal Neurology on April 26. The study examined 39 boxers and Mixed Martial Arts fighters and found post-fight test times on average for those who suffered head trauma worsened by 11.1 seconds, while those who had lost consciousness were on average 18 seconds slower. Those who did not suffer any head trauma actually improved their times by more than a second on average.

“This rapid screening test provides an effective way to detect early signs of concussion, which can improve outcomes and hopefully prevent repetitive concussions,” said Laura Balcer, the study’s senior researcher, in a news release.

An easy screening, such as the King-Devick Test, is needed. It’s estimated that every season, one in five U.S. athletes in a contact sport suffers a concussion and more than 3.5 million sports-and-related concussions occur each year in the United States.

Statistics from the Center for Disease Control show that the chance of a 30-49 year old man receiving a diagnosis of dementia, Alzheimer’s or another memory related disease is 1 in 1,000 and dramatically increases to 1 in 53 for an NFL retiree who is the same age.

Haynes has high hopes the simple King-Devick Test will help to solve the complex problem of concussions in athletes.

“The King-Devick Test provides doctors, athletic trainers, coaches, and even parents, with an easy tool to determine if the athlete should be removed from play to prevent a second head injury, which we now know can have more serious complications if the brain has not yet healed from the first concussion,” Haynes said.

Read more of the Haynes interview with The Sport Update here.

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