2011

Stanford’s Triple Overtime Victory Earns Academy’s Game of the Week Honor

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Stanford pulled out a thrilling, triple overtime victory, 56-48, over Pac-12 rival Southern California in front of a sold out Coliseum to extend its nation’s best winning streak to 16 games.

Stanford forced a USC fumble into the end zone in the third overtime and recovered the ball to come from behind and win. The thriller earned the No. 4 Cardinal (8-0) selection as the winner of Week 9 in the United States Sports Academy’s 2011 College Football Game of the Year contest.

With three minutes left in the game, it appeared that Trojan cornerback Nickell Robey would be the hero, after picking off Stanford quarterback Andrew Luck and running in for a touchdown to put USC ahead 34-27.

But Luck, the leading Heisman Trophy candidate, calmly engineered a touchdown drive that resulted in
Stepfan Taylor running five yards for the tying score with 38 seconds left in regulation. Luck threw for 330 yards and three TDs to help keep his team’s national title hopes alive in a game that saw 88 points scored after halftime.

Both teams notched touchdowns in the first two overtimes. In the third overtime, Stanford’s Taylor ran in for a TD and Coby Fleener caught the 2-point conversion pass for a 56-48 Cardinal lead. USC’s Curtis McNeal then turned the ball over in the end zone to Stanford, which remained unbeaten.

A national panel of experts selects the Academy’s College Football Game of the Week. Each week’s winner is then considered for the College Football Game of the Year contest at the end of the regular season.

Daniel Moore, the American Sports Art Museum and Archives (ASAMA) 2005 Sport Artist of the Year, is commissioned by the Academy each year to create a painting honoring the selected College Football Game of the Year. The Academy donates the painting to the winning university, along with $5,000 for its general scholarship fund.

One-legged Arizona State Wrester Anthony Robles Earns the Academy’s Juan Antonio Samaranch IOC President’s Disabled Athlete Award

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Anthony Robles

Arizona State University wrestler Anthony Robles, who was born without a right leg, won the NCAA 125-pound men’s wrestling title in March, earning him the United States Sport Academy’s 2011 Juan Antonio Samaranch IOC President’s Disabled Athlete Award.

The 22-year-old Robles capped his senior season and wrestling career undefeated at 36-0 and now plans to travel the country as a motivational speaker to encourage others to overcome perceived obstacles. Robles has often repeated that he never considered himself disabled.

“I want to help those kids who like myself, others wouldn’t have been given a shot,” he said following his awe-inspiring national title, which won him the tournament’s most outstanding wrestler award. “I want to help those kids rise out of nothing and achieve their goals, especially in wrestling.”

He has a book being released by the summer of 2012 by Gotham Books and there are talks underway to do a movie about his life. Robles also recently became a Nike athlete, becoming the first noncompetitive athlete to sign an endorsement deal with the company.

Robles definitely showed others that having one leg is no disadvantage in his final NCAA match. The three-time All-American placed his crutches down near the mat and hopped to the center. As always, he wrestled from a down position, supported by two arms and one knee. Then, he won 8-1 over defending national champion Matt McDonough of Iowa.

At ASU, Robles placed fourth in the NCAA tournament as a sophomore and seventh as a junior. He also earned his degree, graduating in May with a bachelor’s in business communications.

Admiral Mike Mullen Receives United States Sports Academy’s Theodore Roosevelt Meritorious Achievement Award

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Retired U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen (left) and Jack Lengyel (right)

Retired U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen (left), the former highest-ranking officer in the U.S. Armed Forces as chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, received the 2010 United States Sports Academy Theodore Roosevelt Meritorious Achievement Award during the Navy football game against Troy, an Alabama university, on Saturday, Nov. 5, 2011. Presenting the Roosevelt award to Mullen is Jack Lengyel (right), an Academy Board of Trustees emeritus, who is the former athletic director at the United States Naval Academy.

Retired U.S. Navy Adm. Mike Mullen, the former Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, received the 2010 United States Sports Academy Theodore Roosevelt Meritorious Achievement Award during the Navy football game against Troy, an Alabama university, on Saturday, Nov. 5.

Mullen, who retired from the Navy in September after 43 years of service, earned the Roosevelt Award for his leadership in the military and his support of those injured in combat, through programs such as the Warrior Games. The Warrior Games is a joint effort between the U.S. Olympic Committee and the Defense Department. It is a nine-sport festival for those wounded in military combat. The inaugural games in 2010 drew 200 military athletes competing in nine different sports.

The Academy’s Theodore Roosevelt Meritorious Achievement Award is presented annually to an individual involved in amateur or professional sport, past or present, who has excelled as a contributor, not necessarily on the playing field, to both sport and society for more than a decade.

The Roosevelt award was presented to Mullen by Jack Lengyel, an Academy Board of Trustees emeritus, who is the former athletic director at the United States Naval Academy. Lengyel was also a college football coach best known for being the head coach who resurrected the Marshall University football program, as depicted in the 2006 film, “We Are Marshall.”

As the 17th Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Mullen was the highest-ranking officer in the U.S. Armed Forces between October 2007 and September 2011. He lauds the Warrior Games for inspiring American service men and women who were injured in combat.

Mullen says the Games are “important to the recovery process of our wounded, ill and injured troops; because when we focus on abilities rather than disabilities, we see that physical fitness and sports can have a healing effect on the mind, on the body and on the soul.”

During his term as the nation’s top military officer, Mullen was influential in ensuring the troops in Afghanistan received the resources they needed, pushing for a troop surge, working to improve America’s relations with Pakistan and supporting the repeal of the military’s ban on gays serving openly.

Prince Albert II Receives Honorary Doctorate from Academy

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Prince Albert II of Monaco (right) receives the International Honorary Doctorate from Academy President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich

Prince Albert II of Monaco (right) receives the International Honorary Doctorate from Academy President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich recently at the Peace and Sport International Forum in the Principality of Monaco.

H.S.H. Prince Albert II of Monaco received the United States Sports Academy’s International Honorary Doctorate in a presentation by Academy President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich.

Prince Albert received the doctorate for his commitment to the Olympic Movement as both a competitor and leader. As the ruler of the Principality of Monaco since 2005, Albert is the only Head of State who is a five-time Olympian and International Olympic Committee (IOC) member.

Albert received the honor from Dr. Rosandich at the fifth edition of the Peace and Sport International Forum on Thursday, Oct. 27 in the Principality of Monaco. Two heads of state, Albert and Hungary President Pál Schmitt, received Academy honors on the same day. Albert and Schmitt, who won the 2011 Eagle Award, are both former Olympians and both continue to contribute greatly to the Olympic Movement.

Albert, who graduated in 1981 with a bachelor’s degree in political science from Amherst College in Massachusetts, steered the two-man and four-man bobsled in Winter Olympics between Calgary in 1988 and Salt Lake City in 2002.

He also has been an active IOC member since 1985, serving on several committees, including the cultural, marketing and nominations committees. Albert, who holds voting rights on Olympic venues, has also served on the Coordination Committees for the Olympics in Atlanta in 1996 and Turin, Italy, in 2006. He has served as president of the Monaco National Olympic Committee (NOC) since 1994.

“The arrangements were outstanding for the presentation of the Honorary Doctorate, which was made in recognition of Prince Albert’s outstanding contributions to sport as a high school athlete, a college athlete, as an Olympian, and of course as a member of the Olympic Executive Committee,” Dr. Rosandich says. “His most recent contribution being recognized, of course, was the outstanding effort put forth in staging the Peace and Sport Forum, which was most impressive.”

Schmitt received the Eagle Award, the Academy’s highest international honor which annually goes to a world leader in sport to recognize that individual’s contributions in promoting international harmony, peace, and goodwill through the effective use of sport. The 69-year-old Schmitt devoted nearly 25 years to the Olympics during his career and earned two team épée gold medals in 1968 in Mexico and 1972 in Munich for the Hungarian National Fencing Team.

Schmitt, who earned election in August 2010 as Hungary’s president, served the IOC as its Chief of Protocol and presided over the World Olympians Association between 1999 and 2007. Elected as an IOC member in 1983, he served as vice-president of the IOC from 1995 until 1999. He was a candidate for the IOC Presidency in 2001 and finished fourth. In Hungary after the end of Communism in 1990, he became president of the Hungarian Olympic Committee.

Game-Winning Hail Mary Touchdown Pass Earns Michigan State the Academy’s Game of the Week Honor

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Michigan State’s Keith Nichol caught a 44-yard Hail Mary pass off a deflection as time expired for the winning touchdown in a 37-31 victory by the Spartans over previously unbeaten and No. 6-ranked Wisconsin in the Big Ten matchup.

The Michigan State wide receiver’s catch on the last-ditch heave by quarterback Kirk Cousins was not only one of the most memorable plays of the season, it also helped the then-No. 16 Spartans earn selection as the Week 8 winner of the United States Sports Academy’s 2011 College Football Game of the Year contest.

Referees initially ruled Nichol down on the 1-yard line but a review of the video overturned the call and gave Michigan State (6-1) the win. Wisconsin (6-1) had rallied to score two touchdowns in the fourth quarter and tie the game at 31 with 1:26 left to play.

But with only 4 seconds left, Cousins rolled out to his right and threw the ball up for grabs into the end zone where it caromed off wide receiver B.J. Cunningham and bounced into Nichol’s arms. Nichol was actually just outside the end zone but he forced his way through three Wisconsin tacklers to barely cross the goal line.

A national panel of experts selects the Academy’s College Football Game of the Week. Each week’s winner is then considered for the College Football Game of the Year contest at the end of the regular season.

Daniel Moore, the American Sports Art Museum and Archives (ASAMA) 2005 Sport Artist of the Year, is commissioned by the Academy each year to create a painting honoring the selected College Football Game of the Year. The Academy donates the painting to the winning university, along with $5,000 for its general scholarship fund.

Prince Albert II Earns an Honorary Doctorate from the Academy

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Prince Albert II

As both a competitor and leader, Prince Albert II, Sovereign Prince of Monaco, has proven himself in sports.

In fact, the ruler of the Principality of Monaco since 2005 is the only Head of State who is a five-time Olympian and International Olympic Committee (IOC) member. For his many contributions to the Olympic Movement, the United States Sports Academy has awarded Prince Albert with a 2011 Honorary Doctorate.

Albert, who graduated in 1981 with a bachelor’s degree in political science from Amherst College in Massachusetts, has always been an enthusiastic sportsman. He has participated in several sports, including steering in the two-man and four-man bobsled. Albert competed in the bobsled in five Winter Olympics between Calgary in 1988 and Salt Lake City in 2002.

Off the icy tracks, Albert has served the Olympics in various leadership roles with the IOC. An active IOC member since 1985, he has served on several committees, including the cultural, marketing and nominations committees. Albert, who holds voting rights on Olympic venues, has also served on the Coordination Committees for the Olympics in Atlanta in 1996 and Turin, Italy, in 2006.

In October 2002, Albert visited Miami for a World Olympians Association fundraiser. The group’s mission was to have the 100,000 Olympians get involved with their communities and talk to young athletes about dedication and training. He has served as president of the Monaco National Olympic Committee (NOC) since 1994. He is a member of the Honorary Board of the International Paralympic Committee.

Outside of the Olympics, Albert founded the Monaco-New York TransAtlantic race. He is also involved in the Peace and Sport organization, which since its inception in 2007 has brought together decision-makers in politics, sport, economics and civil life to promote peace-building and peace-keeping in the world through sport.

Founder of World’s Largest Art Program for Children Earns The Academy’s Distinguished Service Award

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Ashfaq Ishaq

More than 5 million children across the globe have participated in the Arts Olympiad thanks to Dr. Ashfaq Ishaq.

Ishaq founded the International Child Art Foundation (ICAF) in 1997 and it has become a leading art and creativity organization for American children and their international counterparts. The ICAF developed and runs the Arts Olympiad, the world’s largest and most prestigious global program for 8- to 12-year-old children that includes art with a sport motif.

For his contributions to art and sport, Ishaq is being honored by the United States Sports Academy with a 2011 Distinguished Service Award. The DSA is given annually by the Academy to those individuals who have made outstanding contributions to national or international sports through instruction, research or service.

Ishaq, who was an award-winning child artist, also produced the first World Children’s Festival in 1999. Held every four years on The National Mall in Washington, D.C., it has become the world’s largest international children’s celebration. He also hosted the first-ever European Children’s Festival at Olympia Park in Munich in 2006.

As a result of 9/11, Ishaq helped develop a Peace through Art approach with leading psychologists and psychiatrists. That led to a team of art therapists developing a healing arts program that has aided child victims of the Asian tsunami and Hurricane Katrina.

Ishaq is a senior advisor to the Business Council for International Understanding (BCIU) on entrepreneurship development in the Muslim world. Ishaq, who earned a Ph.D. in economics from George Washington University, has authored two books “Success in Small and Medium Scale Enterprises” published by Oxford University Press and a forthcoming book, “The Creativity Revolution.” In 2011, he won The Zeigfeld Award for outstanding leadership in art education and in 2004 won the World Culture Open Award for Exemplary Humanitarian Service.

Virginia Defense Leads Cavaliers to Victory and the Academy’s Game of the Week Honor

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Virginia’s defense smothered Georgia Tech’s vaunted triple option offense and the Cavaliers held on to defeat the previously unbeaten and No. 12-ranked Yellow Jackets, 24-21.

The performance by Virginia (4-2) against its Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) rivals earned it selection as the Week 7 winner of the United States Sports Academy’s 2011 College Football Game of the Year contest.

Georgia Tech (6-1) entered the contest with the second-best totals for rushing and total offense in the country and was eager to improve on its best start in nearly half a century. But Virginia’s defense held the Yellow Jackets to 296 total yards — nearly 250 yards below their season average. The Cavaliers also contained Tech quarterback Tevin Washington, who completed just two of eight passes for 24 yards with two interceptions. Washington entered the game having thrown only two interceptions all season long to go with 10 touchdowns.

Meanwhile, the Cavalier jumped out to a 24-14 halftime lead and hung on to win thanks to its backfield trio of junior Perry Jones, and freshmen Kevin Parks and Clifton Richardson. Virginia’s ground game ate up time off the clock in the second half. For the game, the Cavaliers rolled for 272 yards and two scores on 40 carries, with Jones leading the pack with 152 yards.

A national panel of experts selects the Academy’s College Football Game of the Week. Each week’s winner is then considered for the College Football Game of the Year contest at the end of the regular season.

Daniel Moore, the American Sports Art Museum and Archives (ASAMA) 2005 Sport Artist of the Year, is commissioned by the Academy each year to create a painting honoring the selected College Football Game of the Year. The Academy donates the painting to the winning university, along with $5,000 for its general scholarship fund.

NFL’s Michael Haynes Earns Academy’s Distinguished Service Award

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Michael Haynes

One of the top champions for the health, safety and well-being of football players is former National Football League Hall of Fame defensive back Michael Haynes.

For his efforts to raise awareness about concussions and to push other measures to make professional football safer, the United States Sports Academy is awarding Haynes a 2011 Distinguished Service Award. DSAs are given annually to those individuals who have made outstanding contributions to national or international sports through instruction, research or service.

Haynes is currently the president of Mike Haynes & Associates, a consulting company he founded that helps companies create a winning culture and make a difference in the community. He also has served the NFL in several capacities, including adviser to Commissioner Roger Goodell, vice president of Player and Employee Relations, vice president of Player Development, and chairman of the NFL Alumni’s Health and Wellness Committee.

Haynes delivered his share of brain-rattling hits during his 14-year NFL career with the Patriots and Los Angeles Raiders but these days concussions are one of his No. 1 issues. He’s an advocate for the King-Devick Test, which has demonstrated that in one-to-two minutes it can accurately diagnose a concussion and remove a player from a game to prevent injury from further brain trauma.

Research shows a link between concussions and brain damage and a form of dementia called chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), which can cause symptoms such as chronic headaches, fatigue, sleep difficulties, sensitivity to light and noise, dizziness and short-term memory loss. Statistics from the Center for Disease Control show that the chance of a 30-49 year old man receiving a diagnosis of dementia, Alzheimer’s or another memory related disease is 1 in 1,000 and dramatically increases to 1 in 53 for an NFL retiree who is the same age.

“The King-Devick Test provides doctors, athletic trainers, coaches, and even parents, with an easy tool to determine if the athlete should be removed from play to prevent a second head injury, which we now know can have more serious complications if the brain has not yet healed from the first concussion,” says Haynes, who is an Academy Board of Visitors member.

In addition, Haynes is advocating for pro football fields to be wider to account for the increased size and speed of today’s players. He supports bigger rosters to help encourage coaches and trainers to let players heal longer from injuries. Haynes also wants to see mandates for: properly fitted helmets and other equipment; custom fit mouth-guards that provide mandibular joint protection; objective sideline protocols to determine if a concussion occurred; education of every player, coach, and parent, so they can recognize symptoms of a concussions and know what to do if one occurs; the elimination of devastating hits to the head when a player is in a defenseless position.

“I’m sure several of the protocols being implemented today would have protected guys from sustaining multiple head injuries during their careers in my day,” says Haynes, who is now one of about 20 current and former football players who have agreed to donate their brains to the Boston University School of Medicine for its research on head trauma and brain damage in athletes.

His pro football career began in 1976 when the New England Patriots selected him as the fifth player in the draft. He was the NFL defensive rookie of the year. He was voted to the Pro Bowl nine times in his 14-year-career with New England and the Oakland Raiders. He was a member of the 1983 Oakland team that won the Super Bowl and included Haynes and Lester Hayes forming one of the NFL’s most intimidating cornerback tandems in history. Haynes, who had 46 career interceptions, was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 1997.

Olympic Leader and Sport Entrepreneur Earns an Honorary Doctorate from the Academy

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Harvey Schiller

Dr. Harvey W. Schiller, who has distinguished himself as an Olympic leader and sport entrepreneur during his more than 30-year career in sports, has earned an Honorary Doctorate from the United States Sports Academy.

Schiller has enjoyed an interesting career to say the least, ranging from being one of the executives in charge of World Championship Wrestling (WCW) to serving as the commissioner of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). He has even worked in sports media, serving as vice president, sports programming for Turner Broadcasting System and chairman and CEO of YankeeNets, an integrated sports-based media company with ownership of the New York Yankees, New Jersey Nets, and New Jersey Devils and the precursor to the highly successful YES network.

Schiller, who recently served as President of the International Baseball Federation, is now chairman and CEO of GlobalOptions Group, a multidisciplinary international risk management and business solutions company. In addition, Schiller is chairman of Schiller Management Group and a vice chairman with the Diversified Search Odgers Berndtson executive search firm.

But Schiller is perhaps best known for his involvement in the Olympics. During his four year tenure between 1990 and 1994 as the United States Olympic Committee (USOC) executive director and secretary general, he was instrumental in improving the organization’s financial health. He also helped win the Olympic Games for Atlanta in 1996 and Salt Lake City, Utah, in 2002. Schiller later served on the Executive Board of the 2012 New York City Olympic bid. He also served as a consultant to the 1984 Los Angeles Games as the boxing competition director.

His involvement with the Olympics dates back to 1980 when he served as a U.S. Department of State advisor in Nairobi, Kenya, overseeing an alternate competition for those countries not participating in the Moscow Games. For all of his efforts, Schiller was awarded in 1994 the prestigious Olympic Order, the highest decorated honor presented to an individual by the International Olympic Committee (IOC).

Schiller, often recognized in The Sporting News “100 Most Powerful People In Sports,” earned his bachelor’s degree from The Citadel and is a member of their Athletic Hall of Fame, Business Hall of Fame, and a recent recipient of their prestigious Palmetto Award. He also earned his master’s degree and doctorate in Chemistry from the University of Michigan.

He enjoyed a successful 24-year career as a command pilot in the U.S. Air Force, serving in Vietnam and attaining the rank of Brigadier General. In 1980, the President of the United States appointed Schiller as a Permanent Professor and department chairman at the U.S. Air Force Academy. He is a recipient of several military awards including the Legion of Merit, Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medals, Meritorious Service and others.

In addition, Schiller is active in a variety of national organizations and corporate boards. He served as vice chair of the New York City Host Committee of the 2004 Republican National Convention and as member of the White House Commission on Presidential Scholars. He is a board member of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, the newly formed Air Force Academy Athletic Corporation, Mesa Air Group, the Competitor Group, the Guidepost Solutions Advisory Group, Major League Baseball Classic, the IOC Commission on Women and Sport, and co-chair of the New York City public Business of Sport School.

Expert and Author on Sport Law Earns the Academy’s Distinguished Service Award

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Herb Appenzeller

One of the leading and most respected scholars on sports law and sports risk management in the country, Dr. Herb Appenzeller is receiving a 2011 Distinguished Service Award (DSA) from the United States Sports Academy.

Appenzeller, a scholar in the field and top consultant in sports risk management, has edited or authored 21 books in sport law and produces The Gym to the Jury newsletter. Appenzeller is sought out for his analysis on a wide range of liability lawsuits in sports that have skyrocketed in number as a growing number of individuals seek judgments against institutions and individuals with deep pockets.

During his distinguished career, he has worked since 1956 at Guilford College in Greensboro, N.C., where he served as the athletic director for 31 years, as well as a faculty member, coach and dean of students. Appenzeller, a member of the Academy’s national faculty for more than 35 years, even started a sports management program at Guilford in the 1980s.

The DSA is given annually by the Academy to those individuals, like Appenzeller, who have made outstanding contributions to national or international sports through instruction, research or service.

He has earned numerous accolades for his dedication to sports, including being named to eight sports Hall of Fames such as the North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame, National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (NACDA) Hall of Fame, National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics (NAIA) Hall of Fame and Wake Forest University Athletics Hall of Fame. At Wake Forest where he graduated in 1948, Appenzeller played football for Coach Peahead Walker and played in the first Gator Bowl that Wake Forest won, 26-14, against South Carolina. Guilford College recognized his career contributions that produced countless scholars, athletes and leaders in their fields by awarding him a Distinguished Service Award and naming the football field for him.

In addition, Appenzeller has served numerous organizations, including the National Association of Sports Officials, the Sports Medicine Foundation, and the Center for Sport Law and Risk Management. He has won many awards, including the Safety Society of the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance’s (AAHPERD) 1988 Professional Service Award, and three President’s Awards from the Sport Recreation Law Association (SRLA).

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