2013 October

South Carolina Rally Over Missouri in Double Overtime Earns the Academy’s Game of the Week Honor

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With its starting quarterback struggling, South Carolina inserted backup Connor Shaw in the third quarter with the Gamecocks trailing No. 5 Missouri by 17 points.

Shaw, hobbled by a sprained left knee, engineered three fourth-quarter drives and helped South Carolina score on their final five possessions to stun Missouri, 27-24, in two overtimes and earn selection as the Week 9 winner of the United States Sports Academy’s College Football Game of the Year contest.

Shaw had asked Coach Steve Spurrier if he could play and when given the chance he delivered, throwing for 201 yards and three touchdowns in relief. He generated drives of 65, 69 and 63 yards in the 4th-quarter to help put South Carolina within a game of leading the Southeastern Conference’s East Division.

The incredible comeback was complete when Missouri (7-1, 3-1) missed a 24-yard FG attempt off the left upright in the second overtime. Meanwhile, South Carolina’s (6-2, 4-2) kicker Elliott Fry calmly drilled a 40-yard field goal for the game-winner.

A national panel of experts selects the weekly winner of the Academy’s College Football Game of the Year Contest. Each week’s winner is considered for the award honoring the best College Football Game of the Year at the end of the season. Last season’s winner was Texas A&M’s 29-24 shocking upset of Alabama in a Southeastern Conference showdown.

This committee is currently chaired by Jack Lengyel, the former athletic director at the United States Naval Academy. Lengyel was also a college football coach best known for being the head coach who resurrected the Marshall University football program, as depicted in the 2006 film, “We Are Marshall.”

Daniel Moore, the American Sports Art Museum and Archives (ASAMA) 2005 Sport Artist of the Year, is commissioned by the Academy each year to create a painting honoring the selected College Football Game of the Year. The Academy, also known as America’s Sports University, donates the painting and $5,000 to the general scholarship fund of the annual winner.

The United States Sports Academy is an independent, non-profit, accredited, special mission sports university created to serve the nation and world with programs in instruction, research, and service. The role of the Academy is to prepare men and women for careers in the profession of sports. For more information about the Academy, call 251-626-3303 or visit www.ussa.edu.

International Teaching Assignments

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The United States Sports Academy is currently planning projects in the Middle East and Southeast Asia, including International Diploma programs with the Ministry of Education in Malaysia, and is seeking qualified faculty to teach subjects in recreation, physical education, sports first aid, sports medicine, sports fitness, sports facilities, event management, security and others.

Anyone who is interested in these opportunities must have a graduate degree in a relevant field.  A terminal degree in the field would be preferred.

Instructors selected to teach in the program can expect reasonable compensation in addition to round-trip airfare, housing, food and transportation while on assignment.  Breaks in the teaching calendar may also afford the instructors the opportunity to experience local cultures and attractions in the different locations.

Instructors should forward a letter of interest, resume, and three professional references to: jobs@ussa.edu; United States Sports Academy; Attention: Human Resources; One Academy Drive; Daphne, AL 36526; or fax: 251-621-2527.

Rosandich: 'You Can Truly Make a Difference' in the Lives of Malaysia's Youth

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Editor’s Note: This is the speech given by Dr. T.J. Rosandich, the Academy’s vice president and chief operating officer, during the convocation Oct. 19, 2013 in Kuala Lampur to the first Malaysian teachers to graduate from the university’s International Diploma in Physical Education and Scholastic Sports (IDPESS) program.

Your Excellency, distinguished guests, faculty, students, ladies and gentlemen, I bid you a warm welcome to this convocation honoring the United States Sports Academy graduates of the 2012 International Diploma in Physical Education and Scholastic Sports (IDPESS).

While saya besa bechara sidikat bahasa Melayu, my Malay language skills are not up to delivering this address in the Malaysian language. And, so I beg your indulgence to allow me to do this in English.

Academy Vice President and COO Dr. T.J. Rosandich (bottom row, center) with the university's faculty teaching the second year of its P.E. and scholastic sports training program to Malaysian teachers.

I welcome you all to this convocation ceremony. Speaking on behalf of my faculty seated here behind me, it is a pleasure for us to be here and to participate in this event. This is all about you and we’re pleased to share in your success.

It is important for you to know and understand what this program is all about. You see the Academy has been working in Malaysia since the early 1980s providing training programs and working with many organizations in the sports structure of the country from the municipal to the national level. We have always recommended that these sports structures and the Ministry of Education (MOE) find a way to work together. That is only natural because the beneficiaries of both national efforts are the same: the youth of this country.

All of us here in this room understand the central role that the schools play in the development of the youth. It is you that give these individuals the foundation of learning and skills that prepare them to be productive members of society. Through your efforts, these children learn math and science and social studies with which they develop their intellect and the socialization that will guide them through a long and productive life.

But there is another side to youth development that is often overlooked or minimized in the school curriculum and that is physical education and sports. All too often, PE and sports are considered by parents and schools administrators to be “fun and games” and a distraction from the serious business of learning academic subjects such as math and science. Parents pressure school administrators to add more time for these serious subjects, and this is often done at the expense of PE and sports. All too often, when a school expansion is needed, play grounds are sacrificed and this space, so important for socialization of the youth, is lost.

However, PE and sports are far more than “fun and games” and I do hope this is a lesson that you all have taken away from the Academy’s program. Properly conducted PE and sport programs contribute to the development of youth in many ways both physically and mentally and sometimes in ways that are surprising. For example, research has shown that those students who are physically fit perform better academically than their less fit peers. There are both physiological and psychological reasons for this fact but this can be a powerful argument against those who would end physical education and sports programs.

Beyond contributing to the well being of youth, the ILO found through a meta-study that aside from formal education, there is no better means to prepare youth for productive roles in society than can be accomplished through sports participation. Very simply, sport builds character attributes, such as self-discipline, teamwork and playing by the rules. These and so many other attributes can best be conveyed to the youth through sports participation. All of these attributes contribute to developing productive members of society, who enjoy better health and longevity so long as the lessons they learn are internalized at an early age.

So what you learned through this program and what we hope you will apply in the field is important to us all.

One man clearly understood this and had the vision to understand that the “status quo” had to change. There was a need to reinvigorate the physical education effort and interscholastic sport effort in the schools. That individual is Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin and the program that he developed is the “Satu Murid Satu Sukan” program. I believe that you are fortunate to have in one person an individual who has seen both sides of the coin as the Minister for Youth and Sports and as the Minister of Education. More than that, an individual who with the courage of his convictions, was willing to go forth and make this happen.

The IDPESS program is one of the expressions of this ideal. He understood that both formal education and sports are uniquely human endeavors and to do these thing right, those who implement them need to be trained and have an understanding of what this is all about. It is very simple: one cannot translate a vision to reality, or more fundamentally understand how to go about implementing a program, unless you have the skills to do so. Out of this understanding, this special education program was born. This has been a cooperative effort that has been years in the making from concept, to program structure, to getting the MQA approval, to finally implementation. And the proof is in the pudding, as we say in English, sitting here before us.

Implementation is what it is all about and already the program is beginning to bear fruit. On a practical level, those of you sitting in the audience participated in a very important piece of research this past year when you went out and administered the physical fitness test that was taught in the classroom. Tens of thousands of test scores poured into the Office of the Bahagian Pendidikan Guru (BPG). The Academy’s faculty and staff reduced, analyzed and provided a report on the test results. For the first time, there is a physical profile of the youth of the country, boys and girls, urban and rural, and all age groups. The results of this pilot test have been shared with the senior administration of the country who have found it to be interesting for a very simple reason. When you have good data, you can make good decisions. So your efforts are providing the information to make informed decisions from the tactical level, such as talent identification, to suggestions to curricular modification at the strategic level. An example of the strategic is how the fitness of youth today will eventually play into the health care expenditures of tomorrow. So in a very real sense, your efforts are already beginning to have an impact.

We consider you to be alumni of the United States Sports Academy. We’d be pleased and proud to have you join us in the Alumni Association. I’m a member and many of the faculty members seated here behind me are alumni as well. You can join the alumni association by simply going to the USSA Alumni Facebook page and asking to join.

In closing, I do wish you good luck as you pursue your career as teachers for the Ministry of Education here in Malaysia. I sincerely hope that you apply the lessons learned in the classroom to help your students in the field. You can truly make a difference in these young people’s lives and it is my hope that you do so. Thank you.

 

First Malaysian Teachers Graduate from United States Sports Academy Program

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The first 650 Malaysian teachers to complete the United States Sports Academy’s International Diploma in Physical Education and Scholastic Sports (IDPESS) program will receive their diplomas in a convocation ceremony.

The program was held Saturday, Oct. 19 at Balai Bubaya Tun Syed Nasir Ismail in Dewan Bahasa Dan Pustaka, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

The convocation ceremony also kicked off the second year of the sports program, which is slated to retrain an additional 1,000 physical education teachers in the area of sport to help the country improve its youth sports, among other benefits.

Sarawak students pictured here were among the more than 650 Malaysian teachers who were the first to complete the Academy's physical education and scholastic sports training program.

Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich, the founder, president and CEO of the Academy who has worked with Malaysia over six decades, congratulated the first ever graduates of the IDPESS program.

“I can only marvel at the changes that I have witnessed in Malaysia as the decades have passed,” he said. “From those very early days to today, I have always known that education is the key to success whether it is in the game of life or in a life of sports. May you all realize many years of success on the road ahead.”

Dr. Thomas J. Rosandich, the Academy’s vice president and COO, pointed out that the training the teachers received will help Malaysia’s youth both athletically and academically.

“I hope that all of you will go from here today and apply your new found skills within the schools where you work,” he said. “If you succeed in doing so, you will help to create a better learning environment for all concerned and most importantly, for the betterment of the students under your supervision.”

Muhyiddin Yassin, Malaysia’s Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Education, and the country’s other leaders had the vision to build vigorous sports programs for Malaysian children. It led to the Academy developing a diploma program for the Southeast Asian country that is arguably one of the largest training programs in physical education and sports coaching ever undertaken.

Muhyiddin, who received a 2012 International Honorary Doctorate in January from the Academy at its campus in Daphne, Ala., helped oversee the implementation of “One Student – One Sport” in Malaysia’s schools about three years ago to improve physical education and scholastic sports for the nation’s children. He said he saw a need to provide more physical education and sports training to tens of thousands of the nation’s physical education teachers and coaches, who oversee the students’ development in sports.

This led to the Malaysia Ministry of Education (MOE) approving the Academy’s latest sports education program for Malaysia—the International Diploma in Physical Education and Scholastic Sports (IDPESS).

The Academy has delivered sport and physical education programs in more than 65 countries to more than a quarter million people. The institution, known as “America’s Sports University,” is the largest graduate school of sport education in the world.

Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich’s ties to Malaysia date back to 1957 when he coached the first of his many national track and field teams there. Dr. Rosandich said that he recommended back then to Malaysia’s first Prime Minister Tunku Abdul Rahman, the father of the country, to establish a sophisticated interscholastic sport program.

The Academy’s first sports education programs in Malaysia began in 1981. Over the years, the institution has taught its International Certification in Sports Management (ICSM) and Sports Coaching (ICSC) programs in the country. Today, Malaysia remains one of the few predominantly Muslim nations that maintains close ties to the United States.

The “One Student – One Sport” initiative has been a major undertaking by Malaysia since 2009. This endeavor, which offers more structured and organized physical education classes and sports programs, is seen by Malaysia’s leaders as critical for the health, fitness and learning benefits it provides youth. It also is important to the development of a national system that allows youth to advance in sports, with the best eventually competing in the Olympics or in professional sports.

In the program’s inaugural year in 2012, the Academy trained nearly 1,000 Malaysian educators from June to December and more than 650 completed it successfully and attended the recent convocation. The Academy’s 10-course diploma program is approved by the Malaysian Qualifications Authority (MQA), a national accrediting body.

This continuing education effort is but one part of Malaysia’s strategy to enhance its physical education programs as Malaysia continues to look for ways to develop its next generation of elite athletes. The country of nearly 29 million people has had athletes win a total of six Olympic medals, which have come in badminton and diving. Other popular sports include soccer, field hockey, rugby, gymnastics, martial arts and cycling.

The Academy’s programs are designed to help individuals develop a strong foundation of skills and knowledge required to succeed in coaching, physical education, management, fitness and other sport-related disciplines.

The United States Sports Academy is an independent, nonprofit, accredited, special mission sports university created to serve the nation and the world with programs in instruction, research and service. The role of the Academy is to prepare men and women for careers in the profession of sports. For more information about the Academy, call 251-626-3303 or visit www.ussa.edu.

Auburn’s Defense Seals Upset of Texas A&M to Earn the Academy’s Game of the Week Honor

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The Auburn defense gave up 502 yards to Texas A&M’s Johnny Manziel but he was finally stopped in his tracks, thanks to Tigers’ defensive end Dee Ford.

Ford ensured his team’s, 45-41, upset victory over No. 7 Texas A&M (5-2, 2-2) by dropping the Aggie’s elusive Heisman Trophy quarterback twice in three plays at the end of the game. His sacks drove the Aggies back 30 yards. His last one ended the game when he drug down Manziel on fourth down from the Auburn 21 yard line with 11 seconds left to play.

The thrilling end to the high-scoring Southeastern Conference game earned No. 24 Auburn (6-1, 3-1) selection as the Week 8 winner of the United States Sports Academy’s College Football Game of the Year contest.

Auburn, which entered the game leading the SEC with 287 yards rushing a game, piled on plenty of offense, too. It gained 379 yards rushing against the Aggies with Tigers’ running back Tre Mason leading the way with 178 yards on 27 carries. Mason had a 53-yard run to set up his go-ahead TD with 1:19 remaining when he stretched over the goal line on a 5-yard run.

Auburn’s quarterback Nick Marshall threw for 236 yards and two touchdowns and ran for another 100 yards and two more scores for the Tigers.

It was a sweet victory for Auburn which last year didn’t win a single SEC game and was battered by
Texas A&M, 63-21.

A national panel of experts selects the weekly winner of the Academy’s College Football Game of the Year Contest. Each week’s winner is considered for the award honoring the best College Football Game of the Year at the end of the season. Last season’s winner was Texas A&M’s 29-24 shocking upset of Alabama in a Southeastern Conference showdown.

This committee is currently chaired by Jack Lengyel, the former athletic director at the United States Naval Academy. Lengyel was also a college football coach best known for being the head coach who resurrected the Marshall University football program, as depicted in the 2006 film, “We Are Marshall.”

Daniel Moore, the American Sports Art Museum and Archives (ASAMA) 2005 Sport Artist of the Year, is commissioned by the Academy each year to create a painting honoring the selected College Football Game of the Year. The Academy, also known as America’s Sports University, donates the painting and $5,000 to the general scholarship fund of the annual winner.

The United States Sports Academy is an independent, non-profit, accredited, special mission sports university created to serve the nation and world with programs in instruction, research, and service. The role of the Academy is to prepare men and women for careers in the profession of sports. For more information about the Academy, call 251-626-3303 or visit www.ussa.edu.

United States Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun Receives Academy’s 2013 Eagle Award

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United States Olympic Committee (USOC) chief executive officer Scott Blackmun earned the United States Sports Academy’s 2013 Eagle Award for helping forge one of the most significant agreements in the Olympic Movement.

Blackmun negotiated a landmark revenue-sharing agreement in 2012 with the International Olympic Committee (IOC) over American television fees and worldwide sponsorship revenues that secures funding for both organizations, future Olympic Games and athletes. In addition, among other things the USOC committed $15 million to administrative costs of staging the Olympics through 2020 and $20 million thereafter.

U.S. Olympic Committee CEO Scott Blackmun (left) receives the Academy's Eagle Award, its highest honor, from Dr. Gary Cunningham, an Academy Board of Trustees member, at a ceremony Oct. 21 in Colorado Springs, Colo.

Steering the revenue-sharing agreement and providing honorable and visionary leadership since being named CEO in January 2010, led Blackmun to being named the Academy’s Eagle Award winner. It is the highest international honor given by the sports university and annually goes to a world leader in sport to recognize that individual’s contributions in promoting international harmony, peace, and goodwill through the effective use of sport.

Despite his recent successes that also include adding a host of new sponsors and fielding a U.S. Olympic team that won the Gold Medal count and overall medal count at the 2012 London Olympic Games, the 55-year-old Blackmun remains driven.

“I am incredibly honored to accept this award on behalf of our entire team at the United States Olympic Committee,” Blackmun said. “While we are all pleased with our recent success, and more importantly the success of our athletes on the field of play, we are far from satisfied. There is always more work to be done to ensure that we are providing America’s finest athletes with the resources they need to be successful.”

Among his priorities to move U.S. Olympic efforts forward are: ensuring the continued success by eam USA at the Olympic and Paralympic Games, putting together a successful bid to host the Olympic and Paralympic Games, and more than tripling its current level of fundraising to about $50 million a year. The USOC is the only National Olympic Committee in the world that does not enjoy federal government support.

Blackmun is an ex-officio member of the USOC’s board of directors. He also serves on the IOC’s Marketing Commission that he was appointed to in March 2011.

Blackmun had a previous stint at the USOC before taking over, having served as acting CEO (2001), senior managing director of sport (2000) and general counsel (1999).

Following his departure in 2001, Blackmun became the chief operating officer of Anschutz Entertainment Group, one of the world’s most respected presenters of sports and entertainment events. While based in Los Angeles, he served on the board of directors of the California Chamber of Commerce.

Blackmun has spent more than 20 years practicing law in Colorado and was a partner in two large international firms during his career. His practice focused on sports and entertainment, with an emphasis on project finance for sports and entertainment venues.

The United States Sports Academy is an independent, nonprofit, accredited, special mission sports university created to serve the nation and the world with programs in instruction, research and service. The role of the Academy is to prepare men and women for careers in the profession of sports. For more information about the Academy, call 251-626-3303 or visit www.ussa.edu.

Utah’s Big Upset of Stanford Earns the Academy’s Game of the Week Honor

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Utah quarterback Travis Wilson orchestrated the biggest upset at home in school history and the most significant victory the Utes have had since moving to the Pac-12 three years ago.

The Utes shocked unbeaten and No. 5-ranked Stanford by making a goal-line stand in the final minute of the game and by Wilson throwing two TD passes in the 27-21 victory. Utah’s first signature Pac-12 win earned it selection as the Week 7 winner of the United States Sports Academy’s College Football Game of the Year contest.

It was the first time in school history the Utes (4-2, 1-2 Pac-12) have knocked off a top-five program at Rice-Eccles Stadium. However, it did beat No. 4 Alabama in the Sugar Bowl following the 2008 season.

Quarterback Kevin Hogan marched Stanford down to the Utah 6-yard line with a minute remaining. On third down, he threw an incomplete pass and, then, on fourth down, amid heavy pressure, Hogan overthrew his wide receiver. The loss ended the 13-game winning streak of Stanford (5-1, 3-1).

A week after throwing six interceptions, Wilson helped keep Stanford’s defense off balance with a mix of draws and wide receiver screens. Wilson finished 23 of 34 for 234 yards with touchdown passes of 51 and 4 yards. Despite cutting his throwing hand on a hard tackle early in the third quarter, Wilson continued playing well.

A national panel of experts selects the weekly winner of the Academy’s College Football Game of the Year Contest. Each week’s winner is considered for the award honoring the best College Football Game of the Year at the end of the season. Last season’s winner was Texas A&M’s 29-24 shocking upset of Alabama in a Southeastern Conference showdown.

This committee is currently chaired by Jack Lengyel, the former athletic director at the United States Naval Academy. Lengyel was also a college football coach best known for being the head coach who resurrected the Marshall University football program, as depicted in the 2006 film, “We Are Marshall.”

Daniel Moore, the American Sports Art Museum and Archives (ASAMA) 2005 Sport Artist of the Year, is commissioned by the Academy each year to create a painting honoring the selected College Football Game of the Year. The Academy, also known as America’s Sports University, donates the painting and $5,000 to the general scholarship fund of the annual winner.

The United States Sports Academy is an independent, non-profit, accredited, special mission sports university created to serve the nation and world with programs in instruction, research, and service. The role of the Academy is to prepare men and women for careers in the profession of sports. For more information about the Academy, call 251-626-3303 or visit www.ussa.edu.

Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich Earns Sportsman of the Year Award from Gabarrón International Awards

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Academy Founder, President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich

DAPHNE, Ala.— United States Sports Academy President and CEO Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich became the first American to earn the Sportsman of the Year award from The Gabarrón International Awards, which are being presented Nov. 8 in New York City.

Dr. Rosandich, who was born and raised in Sheboygan Falls, Wis., was chosen for the honor for his “nearly 60 years of continuous dedication and contributions to the creation of several generations of athletes, educators and sports managers in the five continents.” The prestigious award was first won by the late International Olympic Committee President Juan Antonio Samaranch.

For nearly 60 years, Dr. Rosandich, who founded the United States Sports Academy, has been a major figure in sport around the world as a coach and as an educator. As a U.S. Marine Corps infantry officer, he served as the track and field coach for the U.S. armed services. He later was the national track and field coach for various Southeast Asia and Middle East nations for Olympiads from the 1956 Games in Melbourne to the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics. He even served as U.S. Team Handball president at the 1996 Centennial Atlanta Olympic Games.

Throughout his career, Dr. Rosandich has built and established many sports programs, events and facilities. He founded and directed the Marine Corps Relays in Quantico, Va. In the early 1960s, Dr. Rosandich was directly responsible for bringing the Peace Corps—which he turned into the Sport Corps—to Indonesia. During the same era, he played a central role in the founding of the South East Asia (SEA) Games.

In 1966, he founded Olympia Sport Village in northern Wisconsin, which was used for winter sports training by Olympic athletes from all over the world. Dr. Rosandich also established the Paavo Nurmi Marathon in 1971, which is still run to this day.

After serving as the Director of Athletics for University of Wisconsin–Parkside and University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee for nearly 10 years, he founded the United States Sports Academy, “America’s Sports University.” Begun to upgrade the profession of sport, the Academy has remained the only free-standing school of sport in America since its inception in 1972.

Today, it is the largest graduate school of sport education in the world. It offers regionally accredited sport degree programs at the bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels.

In 1984 as part of the Academy, Dr. Rosandich founded the American Sport Art Museum and Archives (ASAMA), located on the Academy campus. Today, it is arguably the largest collection of sport art in the world with more than 1,700 pieces. Also in 1984, he established the Academy’s Awards of Sport, which annually honors people who have made significant contributions to sport in various fields.

Dr. Rosandich holds some 40 decorations of merit from a wide-range of groups. Among them are the highest distinctions awarded by the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and United States Olympic Committee (USOC). The IOC presented the Olympic Order to Dr. Rosandich in 1997 and the USOC presented its President’s Medal to him in 2000. He has served on the IOC Culture and Olympic Education Commission since 1999.

In 2008, Dr. Rosandich received the Ellis Island Medal of Honor from NECO (formerly the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations). The nonprofit annually honors U.S. citizens of various ethnic backgrounds in homage to the immigrant experience. Others who have received the Ellis Island medal include six U.S. presidents, Nobel laureates, business leaders, and sports figures such as Muhammad Ali and Arnold Palmer.

The United States Sports Academy is an independent, non-profit, accredited, special mission sports university created to serve the nation and world with programs in instruction, research, and service. The role of the Academy is to prepare men and women for careers in the profession of sports. For more information about the Academy, call 251-626-3303 or visit www.ussa.edu.

Congratulations to Our Newest Graduates!

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With rolling enrollment, the Academy’s students start their courses as soon as they are accepted without having to wait for the next semester to begin. The Academy is proud to announce its graduates for September 2013.
Bachelor’s Students
Charles D. Freitag (Eagle Lake, Minn.) – B.S.S. Sports Management
Jivaro J. Johnson (Silver Spring, Md.) – B.S.S. Sports Management

Master’s Students
Dale W. Anderson (Lyman, Wyo.) – M.S.S. Sports Fitness and Health
Eleanor M. Gbesemete (Clearwater, Fla.) – M.S.S. Sports Fitness and Health
Phillip T. Mannos (Arlington, Va.) – M.S.S. Sports Studies
John J. Platero (Thousand Oaks, Calif.) – M.S.S. Sports Medicine MSS Sports Fitness and Health Personal Training Emphasis
Brandon M. Pritchett (McCook, Neb.) – M.S.S. Sports Management
Andrew J. Sellars (Pensacola, Fla.) – M.S.S. Sports Coaching

Doctoral Graduates
Kenneth M. Cofer (Adel, Ga.) – Ed. D, Sports Management Human Resources Management

Learn more about Academy programs at USSA.edu.

Chinese Speakers Can Now Take Academy's Online Course on Shaolin Philosophy

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Now Chinese speakers around the world can take the United States Sports Academy’s online course on Shaolin Kung Fu philosophy and history.

The Academy recently began offering the continuing education course, “Philosophy of Shaolin Kung Fu” (CEB 205), in Chinese in its Canvas learning management system.

United States Sports Academy Board of Trustees member Dr. Gary Cunningham (left) presents Shaolin Temple Abbot Shi Yongxin with a original book of the “Philosophy of Shaolin Kung Fu,” online course translated in both Chinese and English on Oct. 13 in Los Angeles.

The newly translated course was presented to Shaolin Temple Abbot Shi Yongxin by Dr. Gary Cunningham, an Academy Board of Trustees member and the U.S. Federation of Sport Universities president, in a hand-made, leather-bound manuscript. His Holiness met with Cunningham Sunday, Oct. 13 during the Shaolin Temple Cultural Festival held Oct. 8-15 at the Los Angeles Convention Center.

The Abbot, who leads 400 million Chan Buddhists, had asked Academy officials to develop an online version in Chinese that he could require his disciples to take. The Chinese course was translated by Mr. Yu-Hsin Li, a teaching assistant in the doctoral program at the Academy. An English version has been offered to students since June 2011.

Ever since Shaolin Abbot Shi Yongxin presented Academy President Dr. Thomas P. Rosandich with a 1,500-year-old manuscript, “Secrets of the Shaolin Temple: Martial Arts and Medicine Scrolls,” in November 2006, the organizations have worked together to develop an online course based on its contents. His Holiness was visiting “America’s Sports University” to receive an Honorary Doctorate.

The world-renowned Shaolin Temple has refined its practices to achieve unparalleled health and wellness over the centuries and because of this, it is recognized for having some of the most respected athletes in the world. The Academy has teamed with the Shaolin Temple to create a course that shares this ancient philosophy’s secrets to balancing the body, the mind and the spirit.

After completing this course, students will know Shaolin’s basic tenents and be able to apply them to the playing field, the boardroom or their personal life.

The course costs $200 and offers students a Certificate of Completion signed by His Holiness and Dr. Rosandich. To learn more or to enroll in “Philosophy of Shaolin Kung-Fu” (CEB 205), please call the Academy at 251-626-3303, email admissons@ussa.edu. Please, click here to learn more about this course and to enroll.

Shaolin Abbot Receives Academy Book with Chinese Version of Shaolin Course

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United States Sports Academy Board of Trustees member Dr. Gary Cunningham met with Shaolin Temple Abbot Shi Yongxin to present on behalf of the Academy a leather-bound version of the sport university’s course, “Philosophy of Shaolin Kung Fu (CEB 205),” in both Chinese and English. The presentation was made at the Shaolin Temple Cultural Festival in Los Angeles on Sunday, Oct. 13. Please, click here to learn more about this course and enroll.

Stanford Edges Washington to Remain Unbeaten and to Earn the Academy’s Game of the Week Honor

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Despite being outgained by 205 yards on offense, Stanford never trailed Washington during the Pacific-12 Conference matchup of unbeaten teams.

The fifth-ranked Stanford held on to edge No. 15 Washington, 31-28, for its 13th victory in a row and earned selection as the Week 6 winner of the United States Sports Academy’s College Football Game of the Year contest.

Ty Montgomery sprinted up the middle untouched to open the game with a 99-yard kickoff return for a Stanford touchdown. Montgomery also had a 39-yard TD reception with 11 seconds before half and give the Cardinal a lead, 17-7.

Montgomery finished with 290 all-purpose yards and two touchdowns, catching three passes for 56 yards, rushing for 30 yards on two carries and racking up 204 yards returning kicks.

Washington (4-1) outgained Stanford (5-0) 489-284 in total yards and the Huskies accumulated a whopping 30 first downs to 14 for Stanford. However, Washington was mistake-prone, committing costly turnovers and penalties against the defending Pac-12 and Rose Bowl champions.

The game ended in the final minutes when officials overturned a fourth-down, 16-yard reception by Washington wide receiver Kevin Smith, who dived for the catch. After reviewing TV replays, officials said the ball hit the ground. Huskies quarterback Keith Price threw for 350 yards, two touchdowns and one interception.

A national panel of experts selects the weekly winner of the Academy’s College Football Game of the Year Contest. Each week’s winner is considered for the award honoring the best College Football Game of the Year at the end of the season. Last season’s winner was Texas A&M’s 29-24 shocking upset of Alabama in a Southeastern Conference showdown.

This committee is currently chaired by Jack Lengyel, the former athletic director at the United States Naval Academy. Lengyel was also a college football coach best known for being the head coach who resurrected the Marshall University football program, as depicted in the 2006 film, “We Are Marshall.”

Daniel Moore, the American Sports Art Museum and Archives (ASAMA) 2005 Sport Artist of the Year, is commissioned by the Academy each year to create a painting honoring the selected College Football Game of the Year. The Academy, also known as America’s Sports University, donates the painting and $5,000 to the general scholarship fund of the annual winner.
The United States Sports Academy is an independent, non-profit, accredited, special mission sports university created to serve the nation and world with programs in instruction, research, and service. The role of the Academy is to prepare men and women for careers in the profession of sports. For more information about the Academy, call 251-626-3303 or visit www.ussa.edu.

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